Roanna Martin

"make [food] simple and let things taste of what they are." {Curnonsky}


1 Comment

Deviled Chicks…

It’s the end of spring break here at WVU, and well, I’m getting ready for something New. Fitting, isn’t it, with Easter being tomorrow?

I didn’t make any big plans because I knew it was going to be crunch time for me on thesis and end-of-semester things. And I’m sure glad I didn’t! However, I was able to visit a friend in Maryland, where she had a SNOW day- she’s an elementary teacher- and we got to spend all day just hanging out. Well, mostly just hanging out… I was working on my thesis for most of it, but regardless, it was still good to be with her.

The remainder of the week has been a bit quiet at my house without my roommates here, but it’s been great to focus and really work on the tasks at hand. (And I’ve been doing things to mix it up too- going running with friends, playing a game of Settlers of Catan with a few others, working at a coffeeshop, sitting on the porch to study, etc…) 

I’m completely done with my 1200 hours of rotations for my Dietetic Internship- it’s hard to believe that after rotating since last June, I’m FINALLY DONE! I don’t think it’s really sunk in yet.

But there are things that remain between me and graduation…

First priority has been my thesis defense presentation, which is scheduled for next Friday. At this point I’m really looking forward to giving it- I’ve been studying home food gardening and kids’ fruit and vegetable intake for the past two years, written a thesis on it, and I’m ready to talk about what I’ve learned. I’ll share more about that with you in a future post.

I also have a few paperwork odds and ends to finish up for my internship.

And, oh yeah, the something “New”:

 

I’m  working on curriculum development for my new JOB. Which is so exciting. I’m going to be teaching cooking classes to little 2-5 year olds and their parents until the end of September. How cool is that? I have the freedom to put together my own curriculum, so I’ve been researching other programs, and pulling from my past 6 years (!?!) of study in Nutrition and Dietetics to create a fun, interactive program. 

I plan to share more with you about that experience as it unfolds, but for now I’m just going to share one of my recipes for the class. I gave it a test run tonight, and I’m taking it to an Easter potluck at my church tomorrow.

IMG_1175

I got the idea (through Pinterest) from this website. 

I hard-boiled eggs using the method described in the America’s Test Kitchen cookbook that my roommate has. It’s super simple: put eggs in a large pot. Cover with cold water, place uncovered on high heat until the water comes to a boil. Remove from heat, put the lid on the pot, and set your timer for 10 minutes. Then place eggs in cold water (iced works best), and commence shelling.

To make these super cute little chicks, lay each egg on it’s side, and cut about 1/3 off the end. I highly recommend cutting on the broader (not pointed) end of the egg, as this is most likely where the yolk will have settled. 

Then pop out the yolk, and put in a small plastic bag, with a bit of yogurt, a squirt of mustard (I used dijon), and a dash of salt and pepper. 

IMG_1172

 

Seal the bag, mash with your hands, cut off a corner, and squeeze to fill the crater remaining in the white. 

 

IMG_1173

Ok, so it looks a bit gross. But trust me, it’s scrumptious. 

After you’ve filled the egg, cap with the remaining 1/3 of the white, and insert a little carrot triangle for a beak, and something little and black for eyes. I used coriander seeds, because that’s what I had in my kitchen. You could also use whole black peppercorns, or a small piece of black olive- whatever you have that works!

Recipe for a pair of chicks:

2 hard boiled eggs (see method above)

1 tablespoon yogurt (the recipe called for greek- I used regular and they were a bit runny. I would definitely use greek next time)

1 teaspoon mustard

salt and pepper to taste

bit of carrot

coriander seeds (or other small black edible objects)

Cut 1/3 off the end of egg. Pop out yolk and place in resealable bag with remaining ingredients. Squeeze out air, and mash ingredients until smooth. Cut a small hole in the corner of the bag and pipe filling into larger piece of the white. Top with remaining white, and give the little chick a nose and eyes.

Yogurt is seriously one of my favorite foods. It’s so ridiculously versatile (sweet, savory, and everything in between!), has a great texture, and is really great for your digestive system. I make my own, and go through at least a quart a week. In this recipe, using yogurt instead of mayonnaise for the deviled eggs cuts way down on the fat, and you hardly even miss it.

I hope you enjoy!


Leave a comment

Banana Bean Ice Cream

I love to be adventurous in the kitchen, and one of my favorite things to make is frozen desserts. Even when it’s cold outside- banana “ice cream” is quite scrumptious. A handful of frozen bananas, some skim milk, a dash of cinnamon, and a few drips of vanilla. Simple and decadent.

I’m also a big fan of my food processor. The thrifted Sunbeam Oskar has a sturdy little motor, and can create about 2.5 cups of hummus, various dips, and purees in a matter of seconds. 

Hummus… bananas… hmmm…. What if, instead of “Vanilla Bean”, I made “Banana Bean”?

To freeze bananas, peel them, and then cut into 1 inch chunks. Place on a metal cookie sheet with sides (a jelly roll pan works well) and place in the freezer for about a half day. Then place the frozen banana pieces in a plastic freezer bag. I have found that they will keep for about a month before they start to get brown. 

I actually froze chickpeas on the same sheet- I cook a whole big pot at once, drain, and then freeze them like this (once again transferring to a bag when they are frozen), so that I can pull out the exact amount I need.

IMG_1059

Banana Bean Ice Cream

Servings: 2

2 bananas, frozen

1/2 cup cooked garbanzo beans (rinsed)

1/2 cup skim milk

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp vanilla

Sweetener to taste ( I used a dash of stevia powder)

Place all ingredients in food processor and puree until smooth.

Scoop out and savor!

This isn’t a decadent ice cream, but it’s good. And it’s packed full of fruit and fiber at 6.5 grams- a pretty good chunk of the recommended 25 grams per day!

IMG_1079

Nutrition Facts 

1/2 of recipe, calculated with no added sweetener. It’s important to note that this is calculated with a medium banana- so  if the bananas you use are extra big or small, this will affect the nutrient content. It might have been a bit more accurate if I had weighed it.
198 calories
7 g protein
42 g carb
1.5 g fat
6.5 g fiber
(DietAnalysisPlus Software)
Speaking of frozen things, cross country skiing has been my preferred form of aerobic exercise these past few weeks. Fresh air, low cost, fun. If you’ve never tried it before, you totally should.
IMG_0999


3 Comments

Green and Gold

I needed a ray of sunshine tonight. Just a bit. It was dreary and drippy and my shoes got wet walking home from my rotation.

 Please don’t get me wrong- I was thankful for my raincoat, and my umbrella, and my warm home to dry off in. But my spirits needed an extra boost. In addition to exercise, nutrient-dense fruits and veggies are a great way to stave off the winter blues.

Every Wednesday night I gather together with a group of friends for dinner, and tonight I was asked to bring a vegetable side dish. I didn’t want to spend a long time cooking, and I was ready for something fresh and raw. 

I pulled a handful of carrots out of my mega-bag that I have been chowing down on the past few weeks.

I scoured the outsides well with a vegetable scrub brush. I don’t bother to peel my carrots- I buy organic carrots- because that way I get to keep a bit of the extra fiber and nutrients, and there isn’t as much waste.

Speaking of food waste, I just happened across this article about using carrot peels (byproducts of the ready-to-eat vegetable industry: aka baby carrots) to create an antioxidant high dietary fiber powder. Cool! But, I’d rather just buy whole carrots, and eat the entire thing, rather than buy pre-cut ready-to-eat baby carrots that create a lot of waste. That being said, if you want convenience food, baby carrots are still a MUCH better snack than a bag of chips!

IMG_1082

I haven’t costed it out, but I am nearly certain that it is cheaper per ounce to purchase whole organic carrots than pre-cut conventionally grown. And considering that I took me only 5 minutes to transform  the above pile into a full bowl of short, easy to munch on carrot sticks, this is a worthwhile way to pinch your pennies at the grocery store.
IMG_1086

To accompany my little Vitamin-A rich spears, I decided to make Green Surprise Dip. I first made this with my supervisor from Joshua Farm when we were giving a demonstration on fresh veggies to a group of moms at a local pre-school. 

It’s super easy.

I steamed and drained a handful of kale, and measured out plain yogurt, chickpeas, a bit of mayo, some garlic, onion, lemon juice, and  a of salt.

IMG_1087

Then I threw them in my handy-dandy food processor, and voila, I had a delicious dip.

IMG_1089

I modified the recipe slightly from the original. My onions and garlic were really strong (they’ve been stored for a while!), and I wanted to keep the concentrated green color so I actually reduced the amount of those three ingredients.

Here’s the recipe:

Green Surprise Dip

1 cup steamed kale, Swiss chard, or spinach

3/4 cup plain yogurt

1 cup cooked chickpeas

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1 clove garlic

1/3 cup onion, chopped

1 Tablespoon lemon juice, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste

The dip didn’t quite get RAVE reviews like an herb veggie dip that I’ve made before, but I really like this one. A bit more salt, and more experimentation with spices would perk it up a bit, but I was on a time crunch.

It only took 15 minutes from when I started cutting the carrots to when I had this dish assembled. But then I had to clean up- and that was another 12 minutes. With a few tunes playing and some dancing around my kitchen, it was a pleasure.

IMG_1092

 


4 Comments

Sprouts Harvest

 

So, after Day 5, came the day of harvest. I started a rotation at a rehab hospital yesterday, so that took priority over blogging yesterday and today- so sorry for those of you who were expecting the “sprout series” to wrap up earlier!

The tower was beginning to teeter, pushed askew by the  muscular mung bean sprouts at the bottom.

The Toppling Tower

The Toppling Tower

Here’s what each tray looked like immediately prior to harvest, which was exactly 6 days after the seeds were first place on their trays. There wasn’t a lot of broccoli left- I had snitched quite a bit to put in salads, wraps, and soups 🙂

Broccoli

Broccoli

At this point in time, the alfalfa is probably my favorite of these three varieties. It has a mild, slightly sweet flavor which is delightful to just eat plain. (Boring, I know, but I can’t always be gourmet!)

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

And these big guys. 

Mung Bean

Mung Beans

To save space in my refrigerator, I just put all of the sprouts in the same container. I think this is probably about 3 cups of sprouts. Including what I harvested earlier, I estimate that I got a little less than a quart of sprouts from 3 3/4 tablespoons (a wee bit less than a 1/4 cup) of seeds. That’s a pretty good yield for 6 days!

Mixed Sprouts

Mixed Sprouts

Tonight I wrapped a whole wheat tortilla with a generous spoonful of garlic hummus around a handful of sprouts, sauteed chicken strips, and some steamed kale. Delicious and simple dinner for 1!

Sprouts Day 5

Leave a comment

These photos were taken last night…

Things are a bit steamy in the tower- I believe that has something to do with the photosynthesis going on. One of my biologist friends might be able to correct me on that, though! The sprouts are just about to the top of their trays, so I think they will be placed in the fridge tonight.

IMG_1043

 

I continue to harvest a little bit at a time. Last night a little bit of each sprouts were stuffed inside a pita bread with tuna salad. I make my tuna salad with tuna packed in water, chopped celery, plain (homemade) nonfat yogurt, and simple seasonings like celery seed, paprika, pepper, garlic, and minute sprinkle of salt. It’s a great high-protein meal. 

Broccoli

Broccoli

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

Mung Beans

Mung Beans

The mung beans have a tendency to get pretty long, stringy, and a bit tough. This might be because as I am taking out sprouts, the remaining ones have more room to grow. I don’t particularly like the stringy texture, so sometimes I’ll chop them before adding them to dishes.

Last week I made some mung bean “pancakes”- pretty much just an omelet. I haven’t quite come up with a plan for these yet.

Does anyone care to share their favorite ways to eat sprouts?

This gallery contains 4 photos

Vegetable Christmas Tree

2 Comments

Vegetable Christmas Tree

I hope that everyone had a wonderfully merry Christmas! I just wanted to share a little masterpiece that I put together for my family’s celebration. The only problem is that everyone thought it was too pretty to eat- although my almost 7-year-old niece was only too happy to eat the yellow pepper star 🙂

I started with a simple styrofoam cone covered with aluminum foil, and then inserted broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, and yellow peppers using toothpicks. Thanks to Pinterest for the inspiration!


2 Comments

Delicata Squash: A Template

Who wants to know what I ate for dinner tonight? Well, I didn’t really think anyone would… but Emily encouraged me to blog about this, so here goes:

For $2 at the Morgantown Farmers’ Market on Sunday, I picked up a wee little gem: a Delicata Squash.

Photo Courtesy of Serious Eats

They are typically about 5 or 6 inches long, and 2 or 3 inches in diameter, and make a perfect meal for two people.

I first discovered the beauty of cooking with these fall vegetables last year, at which point I called them: “My New Favorite Convenience Food” on my previous blog. 

Chop the squash in half lengthwise, and scoop out the seeds.

Place both halves cut side down in a container with a little bit of water. Then either microwave the squash for about 4 or five minutes, or bake for about 15 minutes.

Then, turn the squash over so you have little “canoes”. Fill with items such as cooked beans, tomato chunks, cooked rice, cooked ground beef, sauteed onions, and whatever spices you please. This is a great way to use leftover chili, or pieces of chicken, or anything that’s in your fridge, really! Top with a sprinkle of reduced fat cheese.

Return to the microwave for five minutes or until contents are thoroughly heated and cheese is melted.

For those of you who like measurements and ingredients, here is what went into mine tonight.

Combine in bowl:

1 cup cooked kidney beans

1/2 c shredded low-fat mozzarella cheese (reserving a small amount to sprinkle on top)

1 tsp chili powder

1/2 teaspoon cumin

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Place mixture in partially cooked squash, and return to oven or microwave to finish cooking.

When you pull it out, top each half with 1/4 cup salsa.

 

 

When prepared this way, each squash half contains:

252 calories

6.4 g fat

34.8 g carbohydrates

10.2 g fiber

14.9 g protein

66.4% RDA of Vitamin A

(Nutrient Analysis: Recipes.Sparkpeople.com)

Winter squash is a more-than-excellent source of vitamin A, which is known to help promote and maintain healthy skin, teeth, connective tissues, and vision. So, rather than pay money to pop a pill, why not try some real food that’s super high in vitamins and minerals?