Roanna Martin

"make [food] simple and let things taste of what they are." {Curnonsky}


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Sprouts Harvest

 

So, after Day 5, came the day of harvest. I started a rotation at a rehab hospital yesterday, so that took priority over blogging yesterday and today- so sorry for those of you who were expecting the “sprout series” to wrap up earlier!

The tower was beginning to teeter, pushed askew by the  muscular mung bean sprouts at the bottom.

The Toppling Tower

The Toppling Tower

Here’s what each tray looked like immediately prior to harvest, which was exactly 6 days after the seeds were first place on their trays. There wasn’t a lot of broccoli left- I had snitched quite a bit to put in salads, wraps, and soups 🙂

Broccoli

Broccoli

At this point in time, the alfalfa is probably my favorite of these three varieties. It has a mild, slightly sweet flavor which is delightful to just eat plain. (Boring, I know, but I can’t always be gourmet!)

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

And these big guys. 

Mung Bean

Mung Beans

To save space in my refrigerator, I just put all of the sprouts in the same container. I think this is probably about 3 cups of sprouts. Including what I harvested earlier, I estimate that I got a little less than a quart of sprouts from 3 3/4 tablespoons (a wee bit less than a 1/4 cup) of seeds. That’s a pretty good yield for 6 days!

Mixed Sprouts

Mixed Sprouts

Tonight I wrapped a whole wheat tortilla with a generous spoonful of garlic hummus around a handful of sprouts, sauteed chicken strips, and some steamed kale. Delicious and simple dinner for 1!

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Sprouts Day 5

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These photos were taken last night…

Things are a bit steamy in the tower- I believe that has something to do with the photosynthesis going on. One of my biologist friends might be able to correct me on that, though! The sprouts are just about to the top of their trays, so I think they will be placed in the fridge tonight.

IMG_1043

 

I continue to harvest a little bit at a time. Last night a little bit of each sprouts were stuffed inside a pita bread with tuna salad. I make my tuna salad with tuna packed in water, chopped celery, plain (homemade) nonfat yogurt, and simple seasonings like celery seed, paprika, pepper, garlic, and minute sprinkle of salt. It’s a great high-protein meal. 

Broccoli

Broccoli

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

Mung Beans

Mung Beans

The mung beans have a tendency to get pretty long, stringy, and a bit tough. This might be because as I am taking out sprouts, the remaining ones have more room to grow. I don’t particularly like the stringy texture, so sometimes I’ll chop them before adding them to dishes.

Last week I made some mung bean “pancakes”- pretty much just an omelet. I haven’t quite come up with a plan for these yet.

Does anyone care to share their favorite ways to eat sprouts?

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Sprouts Day 3

Once again, not too much work going on here (on my part).

Just a few rinses today. Take a look at the growth!

 

Tower of Sprouts

Tower of Sprouts

 

Broccoli

Broccoli

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

The alfalfa definitely grew a lot in the past 24 hours…

Mung Bean

Mung Bean

And the mung beans have nearly filled  up the tray! Just a little over 24 hours ago they looked like this:

Mung

Mung

I hope you’re enjoying this little series on sprouting 🙂 Am I inspiring anyone?


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Sprouts Day 2

Day 2, and it’s time for a sprout update. There isn’t a whole lot of action, but subtle signs are starting to show…

Day 2

Day 2

I just finished giving my sprouts their second rinse for the day. Sproutpeople– a company I came across that has had a lot of experience in growing sprouts- recommends using water that is between 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit, and using a lot of water. Sproutpeople also doesn’t recommend the sprouter I have due to some functionality issues. But it’s been working just fine for me, and I don’t intend to go out and buy a brand-new one.

Rinsing sprouts 2-3 times daily gives them the proper moisture that they need to germinate and grow- creating the little nutritional powerhouses of protein, fiber, and antioxidants like vitamin C.

In addition, it is important to make sure that the water is drained off so that the seeds are not sitting in stagnant water to prevent growth of pathogenic microbes such as Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7.  Any food you eat could be potentially risky, so I simply recommending that you make sure to rinse regularly and follow basic kitchen hygiene. Because of the potential for growth of these organisms, the very young, elderly, and those with compromised immune systems are recommended to avoid consuming raw sprouts.

Mung Bean

Mung Bean

You can see the little sprouts starting to burst through the casing. It’s just a little… but it’s a start!

 

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

You can’t see too much happening here with the alfalfa seeds, but just wait another day or so.

Broccoli

Broccoli

And the broccoli has begun bursting out pretty rapidly.

All of the seeds have definitely swollen since last night.

I keep the sprouter in the middle of my kitchen. There isn’t very much natural light available, but they seem to do just fine. 

Note: Sprouts were featured in the Food and Nutrition Magazine by a few other dietitians last year if you feel like checking out what they had to write.